FebriDxTest v2

FebriDx Point of Care Test Device

Improving patient pathways, outcomes and experience.
Optimise workflow and help reduce hospital admissions.

An all-in-one point-of-care test device that can identify an acute respiratory infection and differentiate viral from bacterial causes.

Rapidly differentiate between viral and bacterial acute respiratory tract infections.

An acute respiratory infection (ARI) is one of the most common single reasons for GP visits and antibiotic prescriptions.
More than 90% of patients who present to their healthcare providers with the most common symptom of an ARI—an acute cough—have a syndrome caused by a virus. FebriDx can be used to help triage patients at the point of care to reduce diagnostic uncertainty and avoid unnecessary antibiotics.

Results in just 10 minutes
All-in-one test device
Differentiates between viral and bacterial ARI
CE marked

How FebriDx works

By combining an acute phase inflammatory protein, CRP, and a specific viral marker, MxA, the dual biomarker technology of FebriDx improves the sensitivity and specificity of both markers. Neither CRP nor MxA alone is sensitive or specific enough to differentiate viral from bacterial infections. At low levels, CRP is very sensitive but non-specific at confirming bacterial infection. At high levels, the reverse is true. MxA is specific for viral infections only and will not be elevated in the presence of a bacterial infection.

CRP is an acute phase inflammatory protein that is elevated in both viral and bacterial infections. Bacterial infection is a potent stimulus of marked CRP elevation. CRP is elevated within 4-6 hours of onset and is correlated with the severity of the infection. Normal CRP is less than 3 mg/L. It has been demonstrated that 38-56% of patients with viral acute respiratory infections (ARI) have CRP levels greater than 20 mg/L which may lead to unnecessary antibiotics being prescribed.

MxA is an intracellular blood protein that is stimulated by interferon (IFN) alpha/beta cells. IFN cells are induced by viruses and form an essential part of the immune system’s defence against viral infections. MxA protein becomes elevated only in the presence of acute viral infections and not in bacterial infections.

FebriDx optimises the sensitivity and specificity of both markers to accurately and reliably differentiate between viral and bacterial ARIs.

How FebriDx helps

FebriDx can be used to help triage patients at the point of care and is the first and only rapid, all-in-one point-of-care test device that can identify a clinically significant acute respiratory infection and differentiate viral from bacterial causes.

FebriDx can be used across primary and secondary care with patients showing symptoms of acute febrile respiratory tract infection. It is particularly useful for triaging patients presenting in community care and out-of-hours facilities. When used alongside clinical examination it can speed up the time taken to reach appropriate treatment decisions and potentially ease the pressure on healthcare professionals across a wide range of settings.

Antimicrobial stewardship through the optimal use of antibiotic agents is an important tool in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. Knowing whether your patient has a viral or bacterial infection could have a direct impact on reducing the spread of resistant bacteria.

Antimicrobial stewardship through the optimal use of antibiotic agents is an important tool in the fight against AMR. Knowing whether your patient has a viral or bacterial infection could have a direct impact on reducing the spread of resistant bacteria.

How to use the all in one FebriDx test device

FebriDx is easy to use, user-friendly and can be used with minimal training.

Step 1

Lance finger. Follow standard blood collection procedures for a fingerstick blood sample. Twist and pull to remove the green protective lancet tab. Firmly press the lancet to puncture the skin. Wipe away the first drop of blood.

Step 2

Collect blood sample. Gently massage the finger to encourage blood flow to obtain a drop of blood that hangs from the finger. Place the blood collection tube at a 45-degree angle below the finger, making contact with the hanging drop of blood. Avoid direct contact with the patient’s finger. Fill the blood collection tube completely. Gently squeeze the finger to add more blood if necessary. The blood collection tube must be full.

Step 3

Deliver blood sample. Rotate the blood collection tube over the blood transfer zone allowing it to lock into position. Wait for most of the blood to transfer to the blood transfer zone (~ 5-10 seconds). If the blood does not immediately begin to transfer, reverse the blood collection tube back to its original position and ensure the tube is completely full before rotating back onto the blood transfer zone.

Step 4

Deliver buffer solution. Activate the test by firmly and fully pressing the buffer release button. If no fluid is visible within 25-30 seconds, firmly re-press the buffer release button. Lay the test on a flat surface and wait for 10 minutes. Results will appear in the result window. Do not read results after 1 hour.

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E-Learning

We recognise that things are changing at an ever-increasing rate. Against this backdrop of constant change, our clients need a partner that will help them keep one step ahead.

This has driven and informed our thinking and is why we’ve invested in the Una Health E-Learning app. Delivering our training online is more efficient for our business and our clients’ – ultimately saving them time and money, whilst making it easier to keep up to date and compliant.

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